Wednesday, July 06, 2011

ox-bow, updated

Not surprisingly, the American lynch-mob mentality reared its ugly head following the Casey Anthony trial. The judgmental vitriol exhibited is reminiscent of “A Cry in the Dark,” Fred Schepisi's excellent 1988 film in which Meryl Streep played Lindy Chamberlain, the Australian woman demonized because her form of grief following the killing of her child didn’t meet societal standards, making her suspect.

It's a disturbing film and the American public should be forced to watch it so that it can witness a mirror image of itself.

To that end, "A Cry in the Dark" should be played on a loop with Billy Wilder's prescient 1951 film, "Ace in a Hole" (aka, "The Big Carnival"), which indicted the ravenous meat-eating ways of the media and its penchant for turning human tragedy into a circus.

And that was 60 years ago.

9 comments:

John Kaiser said...

Lynch mobs are alive and well and controlled by the media.

joe baltake said...

Yes, just as the media has nurtured and elevated Sarah Palin and the Tea Party.

Susan B said...

the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Jeremy Seubert said...

"A Cry in the Dark" is a relevant analogy and absolutely nailed the way the public is quick to attack misunderstood behavior. I loved Meryl Streep ambivalent performance it. Wonder if this case will ever make it to the screen. Casey would make an intriguing character for any inventive actress.

Marlene said...

I loved Cry in the Dark. I watched it again a few years ago. I just don't see the tie. If S went missing, and you were partying the whole time I'd think less of you, too. ;-)

Glenn said...

Joe. You've nailed Schepisi's film, and made it relevant again.

Joan said...

Interesting comparison, except Lindy didn't forget to mention to anyone for a month that her baby was missing

Sue said...

...and here I thought this case was all about the death penalty vs. not

wwolfe said...

In discussing "The Ox-Bow Incident," Andrew Sarris said that its flaw was to imply that the lynchings were wrong because the men were innocent, when in fact the important truth is that all lynchings are wrong, including those of guilty people, because all deny the accused the right to due process. I always thought that was a good observation.